schema

Child

DigitalChampions.be wants to make every child in Belgium a digital champion. In order to be successful in this, we will allow children to become familiar with (information) technology in their free time. It is actually when undertaking extracurricular activities, in a club or association, that children develop their interests and their passions are fuelled.

Coding

What is our objective?

By 2020, we want to motivate 20,000 children (including at least 40% girls) to take part in a coding event.

Who is collaborating on this?

CoderDojo Belgium's main partner is Telenet. They want to support this STEM initiative and the Digital Agenda.
An increasing number of initiatives are being created which target the same mission with the same motivation. As well as CoderDojo, there are a number of STEM academies which offer syllabuses with programming workshops, such as Arkades, Cre@te!T, Ingegno, JOMA, MakeIT kamp [MakeIT camp], Techniek- en Wetenschapsacademie [Technology and Science Academy], Topvakantie [Top Holiday]…
A large number of companies such as Cegeka, Deloitte, IBM, ING, KBC and Microsoft are supporting these initiatives on an ad hoc or structured basis.

The best way to teach children how to program is by allowing them to do it for themselves. For this reason, CoderDojo+- organises meetings free of charge - the so-called Dojos - for young people between 7 and 18 years of age.
At these Dojos, boys and girls learn to program, build websites, develop apps and games, etc. They meet young people with similar interests and allow each other to see what they have been working on. CoderDojo turns developing and programming into a cool, fun, interactive and totally happening learning experience.

Dojos are set up and lead on a voluntary basis by mentors with sufficient ICT knowledge and the right drive for coaching young people.

Find out all about CoderDojo here

STEM

When will we be happy?

If, by 2020, at least 80% of 18-year-olds are ‘fluently digital’, which means that they can proficiently handle digital applications and have a number of digital skills which will later serve them well in the employment market.

For many years, the Belgian employment market has been contending with a structural deficiency of technical and precise scientific profiles. The fact that vacancies are not being filled, even in times of crisis, is a clear signal that there is a real need for technical school-leavers and graduates.

The STEM academy fits within the Flemish government's STEM action plan. STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths.

Using the STEM action plan, the Flemish government wants to stimulate the interest of children and young people in exact science and technology through out-of-school clubs. In this way, they hope to inspire young people to opt for a career in this sector.

One of the specific initiatives in the STEM action plan is setting up the STEM academy. Organisers of out-of-school STEM activities are brought together in the STEM academy. Its current offering is already varied and is continuously diversifying.

The STEM academy is co-ordinated by Technopolis. By bundling all of these out-of-school STEM activities on the stem-academie.be portal site, an even wider audience and more potential participants are being reached. In addition, the STEM academy is trying to launch new activities so that even more children can take part in a STEM activity in their region.

Discover the STEM website

Pupils

During their secondary education we want to make progress in training our digital champions. We are ensuring that education itself, the course content and methodology are digitised and are preparing pupils for subsequent study or for the employment market. The digital skills that pupils acquire at the secondary level can then be put to the test in the business community. We are creating a positive attitude amongst pupils, teaching staff and schools surrounding digital learning, but are also outlining what the pitfalls are.

STEM

When will we be happy?

If, by 2020, at least 80% of 18-year-olds are ‘fluently digital’, which means that they can proficiently handle digital applications and have a number of digital skills which will later serve them well in the employment market.

For many years, the Belgian employment market has been contending with a structural deficiency of technical and precise scientific profiles. The fact that vacancies are not being filled, even in times of crisis, is a clear signal that there is a real need for technical school-leavers and graduates.

The STEM academy fits within the Flemish government's STEM action plan. STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths.

Using the STEM action plan, the Flemish government wants to stimulate the interest of children and young people in exact science and technology through out-of-school clubs. In this way, they hope to inspire young people to opt for a career in this sector.

One of the specific initiatives in the STEM action plan is setting up the STEM academy. Organisers of out-of-school STEM activities are brought together in the STEM academy. Its current offering is already varied and is continuously diversifying.

The STEM academy is co-ordinated by Technopolis. By bundling all of these out-of-school STEM activities on the stem-academie.be portal site, an even wider audience and more potential participants are being reached. In addition, the STEM academy is trying to launch new activities so that even more children can take part in a STEM activity in their region.

Discover the STEM website

iRESPECT

What do we want to achieve by 2020?

That children are using the internet safely and constructively.
That teaching staff have sufficient knowledge about social media and the internet so that they can instil the correct critical attitude amongst their pupils.

Who is working together on this?

The iRespect project is a joint initiative of B-CCENTRE, Child Focus, EMSOC and the Digital Champion for Belgium, Saskia Van Uffelen, with support from the European Commission and IWT (Innovation through Science and Technology).

The iRespect package is a teaching tool which teaching staff can use to allow pupils between the ages of 10 and 14 to engage with the issues surrounding online privacy. This tool is aimed towards young people, and thanks to its inclusive approach and the required preliminary research, it can also be deployed in type-1 and -8 special educational schools.

The package consists of a DVD with 10 short, interactive and strong visual prevention videos which help to make it possible to work creatively on the subject of online privacy. Each video has its own teaching sheet, which provides teaching staff with the necessary ‘know-how’ and teaching handles to get started. The tasks are based on situations that they will be able to identify with in which they need to make choices for themselves. The intention is to encourage children to exercise critical thinking skills about a situation and to learn how to deal with difficult situations on the internet.

The following issues are included over ten lessons:

  1. Confidentiality and Privacy
  2. Protecting your account
  3. Being alert on the Web
  4. Internet and Respect
  5. Internet and Creativity
  6. Experimenting and challenging online
  7. E-reputation
  8. Personal information
  9. Cyber bullies
  10. Online information

The iRespect package is distributed to all primary schools in Belgium. iRespect is also available online at:
www.clicksafe.be

Curriculum

What are our objectives?

eaching e-skills has been included in the curriculum of every learning establishment. This digital curriculum is flexible and is being supported by the government, the business community and education together. In it, the focus is on current and future skills. In addition, we are striving to achieve a completely digitised curriculum and there must be an opportunity for personalised learning.

Who is monitoring this up?

The responsible ministries and educational establishments are taking the recommendations to heart and, with the support of various professors, wish to fully integrate computer science into educational standards by 2016.

The Koninklijke Vlaamse Academie van België voor Wetenschappen en Kunsten (KVAB, Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Sciences and Arts) and the Jonge Academie (Young People's Academy), together with representatives from industry and experts in education, have been researching information technology education in Flemish primary and secondary schools and include their findings in current international developments in this field. On this basis, in April 2015 they published a joint report “Computer science in compulsory education” with policy recommendations.

All pupils in both primary and secondary education must acquire a basic knowledge in computer science. Pupils with a specific interest in science and/or technology must also be given the opportunity to further extend their knowledge of these.

Sufficient teachers and those sufficiently proficient in computer science must be trained, and a basis in computer science must be incorporated into other relevant teacher training courses.

This report and these recommendations closely support the international movement to strengthen and extend current teaching in ICT. The current focus on learning to use applications (“applications”) has appeared to be limited. Having a positive insight into the underlying science and technology (“foundations”) and the personal social implications of this (“implications”) appear to be indispensable for effective and sustainable ICT teaching.

Transformation kits

How can we help?

Together with experienced consultants, we would like to raise awareness and support school management teams. We provide a standard step-by-step plan and can coach them towards becoming a top digital school.

How do we measure our progress?

We want to get at least 50% of primary and secondary schools in Belgium to be actively working around a digital plan to achieve a higher Digital Maturity assessment by 2020.

Who are the partners?

Accenture, Deloitte and the Flemish Community.

To make every school in Belgium a digital school, the involvement of the school management team is crucial.

We are currently observing that school management teams which have a clear action plan to digitise their school are attaining better results. However, not every school management team is convinced of the importance or knows how to efficiently approach this.

Students

To prepare students better for the challenges of the digital labour market and the incredible opportunities it offers, we will continue to develop their digital knowledge and skills in higher or university education.

  • Learning methods: on the one hand, we need to work on new learning content and improved learning methods, making optimal use of technology to achieve the learning objectives. Open and online education will be the calling card of our educational institutes in the future. Our aim is open education in terms of accessibility, pace, location, time and programme. But also in terms of an open availability of course material, which can be edited freely.
  • Digital Jobs: on the other hand, we need to invest heavily in the skills of students; marketing skills (advertising, use of website and social media), design skills (web design, presentation techniques), coding and development skills.

These skills need to make tomorrow's graduates attractive for the labour market. We also invest in this. We encourage companies to hire young people for ICT departments and other innovative departments in their company. On the other hand we encourage entrepreneurship in Belgium by creating an environment that allows graduates to develop their innovative and refreshing ideas and establish their own business.

Internships

What are our goals?

In their graduate programmes, companies give graduates space to apply the e-skills they picked up in their training. And they are also given the opportunity to develop these skills further. This means that graduates can be quickly deployed at a high level.

Whose support can we count on?

Accenture, Agoria, AUGent, Dell, Ericsson, Federal Public Service Economy, FOREM, Google, Microsoft, Proximus, Telenet, VDAB, VUB.

A perfect way to optimise and adapt students' digital knowledge to the needs of the workplace, are ‘internships’ or long-term apprenticeships within companies. Various companies offer management training programmes to young graduates. On average, they take between 1 and 3 years. The set-up of these programmes is often similar: the trainees get to know the different departments in the company and in this way gain knowledge and experience in various fields. They discover what they like to do and what they are good at. In addition, the emphasis is also very much on training, personal development and coaching. Often the trainees are also assigned a mentor. It is the mentor's role to guide and help his or her trainee to grow in the company.

These internships allow companies to attract big talents, young people who challenge the existing methods in the company, with a new look on tools and processes. In this way, the companies reinvent themselves and meet the needs of a changing market.

Adults

We also continue to invest in the ‘digital education’ of adults of all ages. We make them aware of the fact that having digital skills can lead to a job with a different and/or better content. And why not consider a job in the ICT sector? We focus on certain target groups who are digitally ignorant today, and thus work on the integration of these people in society and the labour market.

Life-long learning

When are we happy?

If in 2020 at least 80% of Belgians has sufficient digital skills to carry out new jobs.

Who supports this?

Actiris, FOREM, VDAB

In 2020, 90% of jobs will require digital skills according to the European Commission. Today only 60% of Belgians have enough digital skills to carry out these jobs.

That is why it is important we encourage everyone to constantly work on his or her personal digital skills. In this way we ensure that people can easily re-orientate in a changing labour market.

Digital Inclusion

When are we happy?

When 70% of Belgians on the labour market is able to follow a digital training.

Who like to help with this?

Agoria, VDAB, FOREM.

Not everyone has the means, the opportunity, skills or the self-confidence to learn or take full advantage of the many possibilities of new digital technologies. Through targeted measures, we want to eliminate the digital divide and make sure that nobody stays behind. We are particularly attentive to certain target groups, such as elderly people, the underprivileged or foreign speakers.

Because the Internet has the strength to connect people, we promote the enormous opportunities it offers to inform people: involving them in the public debate, bringing them in contact with a new employer or staying in contact with family or carers at home.

Digital Bath

What specifically do we do?

We start by testing 3,000 CEOs on their knowledge of the digital sector. Depending on the test results, we organise specific actions.

Our partners?

Agoria, Accenture, Acteris, Dell, Deloitte, Ericsson, Federal Public Service Economy.

In cooperation with various partners, DigitalChampions.be is launching a specific action to explain to everyone, in an easily understandable way, what a digital world is all about. It is not all about technology. It concerns a new way of doing business, of living, learning, steering, risk management, etc., all based on new technologies.

What opportunity can 3D printing present to the economy? How can we ensure that entrepreneurs in Belgium take initiatives? And how can we provide better support to these entrepreneurs to put Belgium on the map as a knowledge-based society through healthy and growing examples.